Museo di Triora 5 Ethnographic Section

Ethnographic Section

Created as a result of the enthusiasm of the young people of the Campo Eco organised by the Municipality of Genoa in 1982-83 and the immediate enthusiastic response of the people of Triora, the Triora Ethnographic and Witchcraft Museum now gathers together a large number of ancient objects. These are sometimes still in use in remote hamlets in the municipal area, such as Borniga or Goina, and bear witness to a particularly lively and vibrant farming and pastoral culture.

The Triora Museum, far from being a sterile exhibition of objects, still invites you to visit the old town and explore its enchanting hamlets, where in some cases you will be able to see the use of tools noticed in these rooms.

It will therefore be possible, in contact with an almost uncontaminated nature, to glimpse and breathe moments of “another life”, perhaps in some way more authentic.

If you want to look for man, do not stop at the inanimate objects we have displayed, but go up and see the setting in which the tools of daily work were and are used; in the houses and fields, on the paths paved with hard work, in the natural environment in which man worked and from which materials and technologies were taken, born of this nature and developed with the sole help of hands and a few tools.

You will find yourself, perhaps without knowing it, in one of the most beautiful places in Liguria, in the Regional Park of the Western Maritime Alps, where ancient human settlements, old traditions and endemisms of all kinds still coexist.

The basement of the Corso Italia headquarters hosts the Museum’s Ethnographic Section, divided into five cycles:

Life in the fields

Here, in this large room, which represents the beginning of the sense of the visit to the Ethnographic Section of the Museum, the tools used in the daily work in the fields of the farmers and those used for the transport of the goods by the muleteers are exposed.

The grain cycle and ancient trades

On the walls of this room some “Correggiati”, the oldest tools used by farmers for threshing grain and fodder.

To remind us of the importance of bread for the economy of the village, the mouth of an oven has been reconstructed, with a table next to it for mixing the flour and a long wooden shovel for placing the bread inside.

Next to it or hanging on the wall, you can see axes and saws to underline the great use of wood for making sticks, agricultural tools and baskets of all sizes.

The anvil on the wooden block is a simple but fitting acknowledgement of the activity of the blacksmith, who in these areas was also necessarily skilled as a farrier.

“Ciclo del Castagno” (Chestnut cycle)

In the display case containing objects from the chestnut cycle there is a mould, used to prepare wafers, perhaps with a symbol or drawing on them.

Between two of these, hazelnuts and even a few pieces of walnuts mixed with honey are placed as Christmas approaches. These are the characteristic “turrun”, which are often particularly popular gifts.

“Ciclo del latte” (Milk cycle)

A spinning wheel, a carding machine, numerous cards and shears, as well as eloquent photographs, remind us of the importance of wool, used to make clothes and blankets.

Some photos and panels tell of an activity that has been completely abandoned: that of using apples to make cider, a low-alcohol drink.

The kitchen

The one reconstructed in the Museum is a rustic kitchen, i.e., that which existed in the homes of poor families or in certain farmhouses in the thick of the chestnut woods or in their vicinity.

Objects of daily use are placed in a cupboard, others on shelves, still others hanging on the wall with hooks. One notices plates, glasses, pots, cutlery, pans, buckets, jugs, soup tureens, strainers, mortars, grinders and so on, objects which today are often used as knick-knacks, having perhaps been the subject of a bargain in a shop or at an antiques stall. Some objects of particular use arouse curiosity and wonder.

The cellar

you can find bellows and sulphur machines of different sizes and sulphur machines, used to fight pests, next to bottles, flasks, flasks, gourds, funnels, corkscrews, plugs, shears, scrapers, verinas and corking machines for bottling.

Objects of daily use are placed in a cupboard, others on shelves, still others hanging on the wall with hooks. One notices plates, glasses, pots, cutlery, pans, buckets, jugs, soup tureens, strainers, mortars, grinders and so on, objects which today are often used as knick-knacks, having perhaps been the subject of a bargain in a shop or at an antiques stall. Some objects of particular use arouse curiosity and wonder.